Appendix A

EXTRACTS FROM THE

2000/2001 PERFORMANCE PLAN

 

SOCIAL INCLUSION AND CARE

 

 

CONTENTS

SECTION 1 KEY GOALS                                                                        Page

1.1 Key Goals and their Targets ……………………………………….. 2

1.2 Quality of Life Indicators ……………………………………………. 5

 

SECTION 2 REVIEW OF 1999/2000

2.1 How well we achieved last year’s outcomes ……………………. 7

2.2 Performance Compared with other Counties …………………… 10

2.3 Acting on Audit and Inspection …………………………………… 13

2.4 How We Involved the Public Last Year …………………………. 16

2.5 Services We Reviewed Last Year ………………………………… 20

2.6 Major Investments We Made Last Year …………………………. 20

 

SECTION 3 PLANS FOR 2000/2001

3.1 Planned Activities and Expected Achievements ……………… 21

3.2 Our Targets for Measures of Success ………………………….. 27

3.3 Expected Audit and Inspection in the Coming Year …………. 29

3.4 Plans for Involvement this Coming Year ……………………….. 30

3.5 The 5 Year Programme of Service Reviews …………………… 32

3.6 Major Investments We are Making ………………………………. 34

 

1 KEY GOALS

     

1.1 Key Goals and their Targets

Goal 3: Protection and Care for Vulnerable Children

This goal falls within the "Social Inclusion and Care" service theme.

 

Our Targets:

  • by March 2001, increase to 30 the number of children in the care of the Council who are adopted per year (24 in 1999)
  • by March 2001, ensure at least 50% of those leaving care at 16+ have a GCSE or GNVQ qualification
  • by March 2001, ensure that 100% of children on the Child Protection register are reviewed at least every six months (77% in 1999)

 

The National Picture

The Government's White Paper, Modernising Social Services, published in November 1998, sets out what the Government proposes to do to modernise social services in line with its other proposals for the NHS and for improving health and reducing health inequalities. The White Paper sets out proposals for change in services for children in three priority areas:

  • protection from sexual, physical and emotional abuse and from neglect
  • quality of care, so that care is as close as possible to the care provided by loving and responsible parents
  • improving the life chances of children in care, and of others - "children in need" - who need social services support, in particular through improving their health and education and support after they leave care.

The White Paper was followed with National Priorities Guidance in 1998 and 1999, which set out national targets for social services which are expected to be developed and implemented locally.

With respect to the needs of children, the Government has also launched Quality Protects, a comprehensive three-year programme to improve the quality of services for children requiring the active support of social services. There are eight main objectives which include ensuring that:

  • children are securely attached to carers capable of providing safe and effective care
  • children who are looked after gain maximum benefits from educational and other opportunities
  • children are protected from abuse and neglect

 

Norfolk’s Needs

Norfolk's Children's Services Plan Strategy 1997/2000 sets out assessments of local needs and objectives for multi-agency services for children in need. These have been delivered through a rolling programme of action plans. For 2000-2001, the main focus of needs assessment and service delivery within Social Services will be Norfolk's Quality Protects Management Action Plan. This is complemented by the Norfolk Health Improvement Programme, the Early Years Development Plan, the Behaviour Support Plan and the Early Years and Childcare Plan. Norfolk Social Services performance is now assessed against a national Performance Assessment Framework. Generally its performance is comparable to that of equivalent shire counties.

 

 

 

Goal 4: Independent Living for as Many as Possible

This goal falls within the "Social Inclusion and Care" service theme.

    Our Targets:

  • by March 2001, increase to 250 the number of people aged 18 to 64 who do not have to move into residential care because they are helped to live at home (215 in September1998)
  • by March 2001, increase to 750 the number of people aged 65 or over who do not have to move into residential care because they are helped to live at home (729 in September1998)
  • by March 2001, reduce to 340 the number of people aged 18 to 64 who have to move into residential care during the year (350 during 1999)
  • by March 2001, ensure the number of people aged 65 or more who have to move into residential care remains constant, despite the increase in the County’s elderly population (currently 1,987)

The National Picture

The Government's White Paper, Modernising Social Services, published in November 1998, sets out what the Government proposes to do to modernise social services in line with its other proposals for the NHS and for improving health and reducing health inequalities. The White Paper sets out proposals for change in services for adults in three priority areas:

  • promoting independence
  • increasing consistency across the country and
  • providing convenient, user-centred services.

The Government wishes to see greater independence at the heart of social services for adults. This involves better preventative services, an extension of direct payment schemes, improved support to enable service users to work, and more support for carers. As a consequence, people should be offered services that:

  • allow them the maximum possible independence;
  • are arranged in a way that lets them do as much as possible for themselves and allows then wherever possible to live in their own homes; and
  • make sure that efforts are made to avoid people at risk of losing their independence from having to be admitted to hospital or a care home.

The White Paper was followed with National Priorities Guidance in 1998 and 1999, which set out national targets for social services which are expected to be developed and implemented locally.

Norfolk’s Needs

Norfolk has had higher usage of residential/nursing home care than many shire counties. This is, in part, due to the difficulties of providing social care at home in such a rural county and, in part, it reflects Norfolk’s higher proportion of people aged 80+ in its population who are more likely to be in residential or nursing homes. The aim is to reduce the use of residential and nursing home care and provide support to people at home by developing a wide range of local services in the community.

There are a number of plans which focus on this aim. They have identified needs through working with service users and carers, statutory agencies in health and housing, social care providers and voluntary sector bodies. These include the Community Care Plan, the Partnership Plan, Norfolk's Prevention and Carers' Plans, Me, Myself, I for people with learning disabilities and the Joint Investment Plans for older people and for adults with mental health problems.

 

 

    1. Quality of Life Indicators

All County Council services are involved, either directly or indirectly, with the quality of life of those who live in, work in, or visit Norfolk. The overarching aim of both Central and Local Government is to use their powers to guide changes in the County towards improved quality of life – not only for those living now, but for those in generations to come. Such beneficial change is often called "sustainable development". It means a more inclusive society in which the benefits of increased economic prosperity are widely shared, with less pollution and less wasteful use of natural resources

The County Council is only one influence on quality of life. Other public and private bodies, voluntary and community groups, large and small businesses, and actions of every individual play an important part.

The County Council believes, however, that it has an important role in monitoring the quality of life in the County to help a concerted effort by all towards sustainable development.

To this end, this Section is an attempt at measuring life quality – even if in a relatively simplistic way. In future years we will report on how things are changing – either for the better or for the worse.

In their research on sustainable development indicators, the Government has defined 15 areas important to monitor quality of life. These are as follows:

Social

  • poverty
  • education
  • health
  • housing
  • safety

Economic

  • economic output
  • investment
  • employment

Environmental

  • climate change
  • air quality
  • road traffic
  • river water quality
  • wildlife
  • land use
  • waste

 

Choosing a key indicator in each of these areas enables us to develop a "basket" of indicators that we can use to reflect quality of life in the County.

The County Council has yet to determine the appropriate indicators to use. Some are related to County Council services, but most belong to Partnerships or are key targets of other organisations or partnerships. Discussions now need to take place with those concerned.

The Government has defined indicators that they see as appropriate at the national scale. These need to be discussed to see how appropriate they are for local use in Norfolk.

The Table below lists the Government indicators and the lead organisations and partnerships concerned.

Key Quality of Life Indicators for Norfolk

Area

Government suggested
key indicator

lead organisation(s) / partnerships

economic output

Gross Domestic Product

Shaping the Future Partnership

investment

Level of investment as a proportion of GDP

Shaping the Future Partnership

employment

Unemployment rates

Shaping the Future Partnership

poverty/social inclusion

mixed combined indicator

District Councils / County Council / Health Authority

education

proportion of young people gaining formal qualifications

County Council

health

average life expectancy

Health Improvement Programme Partnership

housing

proportion of homes unfit to live in

District Councils

safety

crime rate

Community Safety Partnerships

climate change

emission of greenhouse gases

ALL

air quality

pollution measurements

District Councils

road traffic

traffic levels

County Council

river water quality

chemical/biological measurement

Environment Agency

wildlife

number of wild birds

English Nature / County Council
key non-governmental orgs

land use

% homes built on
previously developed land

County Council /
District Councils

waste

tonnes of waste produced

Norfolk Waste Management Partnership (County Council, District Councils & Businesses

  1.  
  2. REVIEW OF 1999/2000
  3.  

    1. How well we achieved last year’s outcomes
    2.  

      EXPECTED OUTPUT BY OUTPUT ACHIEVED

        Develop social strategies by understanding needs and defining required responses

      Production of a joint strategy with Health and Housing on services for elderly mentally ill people. Sep 1999 Achieved
      0Production of Joint Investment Plans with the Health Authority for services for older people, learning disability, mental health and physical disability Mar 2000 Achieved for services for older people, mental health

      Not achieved for services for people with learning disability, ( now March 2001) and physical disability ( now subsumed into Welfare to Work JIP by March 2001) due to changing requirements by DoH (recognition that they were asking for too many plans at the same time)

      Support those excluded from the labour market by assisting individuals to participate in economic activity
      Production of a joint social cohesion strategy for Norfolk Mar 2000 Strategy for consultation by end of March 2000
      Development of specific initiatives identified in the strategy Mar 2000 From March 2000 onwards within Shaping the Future
      Review of NCC support for Rural Community Council Mar 2000 Background work done. Delayed due to delay in appointing new Chief Executive for Rural Community Council Will complete early in 2000/01
      Development of VOLCAAN project Mar 2000 Achieved - will continue to June 2000

        Improve Health in Norfolk by involvement in the Health Improvement Programme

      County Council will play a full part in the development and implementation of the first Norfolk Health Improvement Programme   Achieved
      EXPECTED OUTPUT BY OUTPUT ACHIEVED

        Better meet children’s needs by integrating all forms of support

      Appointment of new Head of Early Years and Child Care Strategy Dec 1999 Achieved
      Establishment of new Joint Children’s Services Working Group composed of Education/SS members and representatives of Health Authority Sep 1999 Achieved
      Establishment of new joint planning arrangements to develop Children’s Services Plan Sep 1999 Achieved
      Promote independence for vulnerable individuals through working in partnership with other agencies
      Commence implementation of the National Service Framework for mental health services, when received from central government.   Achieved but slow start
      Establishment of improved rehabilitation services for older people Mar 2000 Achieved
      Appointment of additional occupational therapists and additional equipment to reduce waiting times for assessment to 8 weeks maximum Mar 2000 Achieved appointment of staff and additional equipment. Waiting times for delivery of equipment around 7 days; numbers on the waiting list for assessments for over 8 weeks at the end of January were 519 out of 942 people (mostly in lower priority categories). Improvement in performance but unlikely to meet target due to delays in recruitment and rise in referrals due to increasing older/ disabled population.

        Conduct activities which protect the disadvantaged from unfair or unsafe trading

      Identify 20 risk areas which are likely to affect disadvantaged groups, and publicise them   Achieved

       

      EXPECTED OUTPUT BY OUTPUT ACHIEVED
      Enhance child protection by implementing government guidance, and reorganising services
      Increase from 95% to 100% the percentage of children on the Child Protection Register with an allocated social worker Mar 2000 Achieved
      Re-focus child protection services Mar 2000 Achieved

        To deliver responsibilities related to travellers

      Meeting the accommodation needs of the travelling community   5 gypsy sites continue to be managed. Except for those displaying anti social behaviour all Travellers wishing for a pitch have been accommodated
      Minimise the adverse effects of unauthorised encampments   Adverse effects include untidiness, lack of toilet facilities, untethered animals, obstruction to the highway and threatening atmosphere. The Traveller Liaison Officer (TLO) visited 52 encampments in 1999 to explain the Code of Practice for Unauthorised encampments to Travellers and to local people
      Reduce the number of complaints   Record being initiated of numbers of complaints dealt with by the County Council

        Assist those who do not have access to the private car by promoting the alternatives

      Work with the Rural Transport Partnerships to develop 2 action plans Mar 2000 Achieved
      Establish integrated passenger transport unit Nov 1999 Achieved

       

       

    3. Performance Compared with other Counties
    4.  

      Indicators where Highest is not necessarily Best or Worst (NCC = Norfolk County Council position)

      Results for all County Councils 1998/99

      ACPI 1998/99

      AC/BV PI 2000/01

      Performance Indicator Definition

      Norfolk in 98/99

      Lowest

      Lowest 25%

      Mid Point

      Highest 25%

      Hi’est

      L10a

      AC

      C4a The number of children being looked after by the local authority per 1,000 children

      3.99

      1.95

      3.13

      3.64

      N

      C

      C

      4.38

      5.7

      L11a

      AC

      C5a The number of children on the child protection register per 1,000 children

      3.26

      3.7

      N

      C

      C

      2.63

      2.25

      1.68

      1.05

      L14

      The net expenditure per head of population on social services, as follows:

      L14a

      Adults 65 and over

      76.88

      0.64

      58.78

      67.29

      74.49

      N

      C

      C

      96.75

      L14b

      Physical disabilities

      15.99

      5.99

      9.12

      11.23

      14.02

      N

      C

      C

      23.54

      L14c

      Learning disabilities

      15.98

      14.17

      N

      C

      C

      19.04

      23.13

      25.99

      30.10

      L14d

      Mental health

      9.69

      4.62

      6.16

      7.61

      9.32

      N

      C

      C

      14.37

      L14e

      Children's services

      34.71

      19.58

      29.07

      34.40

      N

      C

      C

      37.12

      44.52

      L14f

      Other

      2.01

      0.24

      1.54

      N

      C

      C

      2.07

      2.89

      6.97

      L14g

      Total

      155.27

      108.94

      136.32

      144.49

      154.92

      N

      C

      C

      178.45

      Indicators where Highest suggests Best or Worst (NCC = Norfolk County Council position)

      Results for all County Councils 1998/99

      ACPI 1998/99

      AC/BV PI 2000/01

      Performance Indicator Definition

      Norfolk in 98/99

      Worst

      Worst 25%

      Mid Point

      Best
      25%

      Best

      L1

      The number of people aged 65 and over whom the authority helps to live at home, per 1,000 adults aged 65 and over

      50.9

      35.89

      47.94

      N

      C

      C

      58.7

      64.93

      143

      L2

      The number of adults under 65 whom the authority helps to live at home in the groups below, per 1,000 adults under 65:

      L2a

      With physical disabilities

      2.4

      0.69

      1.32

      1.66

      2.31

      N

      C

      C

      5.08

      L2b

      With learning disabilities

      2.5

      0.77

      1.77

      2.3

      N

      C

      C

      2.9

      4.6

      L2c

      With mental health problems

      0.7

      0.1

      0.63

      N

      C

      C

      0.81

      1.39

      3.84

      L3

      BVPI

      56 The percentage of items of equipment costing less than 1,000 provided within three weeks of assessment

      86.80%

      60.90%

      76.20%

      85.75%

      N

      C

      C

      93.80%

      99.93%

      L4

      AC

      C2 The number of nights of respite care provided or funded by the authority per 1,000 adults

      89

      0.64

      65.38

      87.64

      N

      C

      C

      113.7

      171.89

      L5

      AC

      C3 The number of people whom the local authority supports in residential care in the groups below, per 1,000 people in the relevant age category:

      L5a

      AC

      C3a Adults 65 and over

      23.69

      14.84

      19.78

      21.97

      N

      C

      C

      25.58

      33.52

      L5b

      AC

      C3b Adults under 65 with physical disabilities

      0.36

      0.02

      0.2

      0.25

      0.27

      N

      C

      C

      0.39

      L5c

      AC

      C3b Adults under 65 with learning disabilities

      0.9

      0.29

      0.65

      N

      C

      C

      0.9

      1.11

      1.65

      L5d

      AC

      C3b Adults under 65 with mental health problems

      0.59

      0.08

      0.14

      0.19

      0.31

      N

      C

      C

      0.59

      L6

      The percentage of adults going into residential care who were offered single rooms

      86.80%

      64.00%

      81.14%

      N

      C

      C

      98.30%

      100.00%

      100.00%

      L7

      The percentage of inspections of residential homes for adults which should have been carried out that were carried out

      100%

      78.10%

      95.95%

      100.00%

      100.00%

      N

      C

      C

      100.00%

      L8

      BVPI

      58 The percentage of people receiving help from the authority who have been given a statement of what their needs are and how they will be met

      71.40%

      43.00%

      66.66%

      N

      C

      C

      75.40%

      89.25%

      100.00%

      L9a

      The percentage of new services begun in 1998/99 for which a starting date was provided to the client

      87.80%

      0.00%

      82.79%

      N

      C

      C

      95.38%

      100.00%

      100.00%

      L9b

      Where a start date was given, the percentage of occasions when that date was met

      88.20%

      53.00%

      N

      C

      C

      89.00%

      97.00%

      98.30%

      100.00%

      L10b(i)

      AC

      C4bi The percentage of these children who are: In residential accommodation

      14.20%

      5.50%

      10.08%

      13.15%

      N

      C

      C

      15.65%

      22.47%

      L10b(ii)

      AC

      C4bii The percentage of these children who are: In foster care

      72.40%

      55.00%

      63.14%

      69.75%

      N

      C

      C

      74.25%

      83.00%

      L10b(iii)

      The percentage of these children who are Supported to live independently

      4.30%

      0.00%

      1.38%

      2.02%

      3.20%

      N

      C

      C

      9.29%

      L10b(iv)

      The percentage of these children who are: Supported in other ways

      9.10%

      26.10%

      19.65%

      15.65%

      12.42%

      N

      C

      C

      7.10%

       

      L10c

      BVPI

      49 The percentage of these children who moved home three times or more during the year

      8.10%

      24.27%

      9.69%

      N

      C

      C

      7.66%

      5.25%

      2.00%

      L11b

      The percentage of these children who have been on the register for two years or more

      9.10%

      17.50%

      N

      C

      C

      9.03%

      6.68%

      3.45%

      1.16%

      L12

      The percentage of inspections of children's residential homes that should have been carried out that were carried out

      100%

      60.00%

      89.02%

      100.00%

      100.00%

      N

      C

      C

      100.00%

      L13

      The percentage of inspections of day nurseries that should have been carried out that were carried out

      94.90%

      72.28%

      89.00%

      N

      C

      C

      95.56%

      100.00%

      100.00%

       

       

    5. Acting on Audit and Inspection

The County Council receives independent reports following various audit and inspection by external bodies. This Section lists the major audits and inspections that have occurred during the last year and, for each, outlines the main findings and the actions that have followed.

 

Social Services Inspectorate assessment of the Performance of the Social Services Department

Twice yearly an assessment is carried out on the performance of the Social Services Department. The assessment involves the completion of a 58 page self-assessment questionnaire followed by a visit from the Social Services Inspectorate and the Regional Office of the Department of Health.

The purpose of the exercise is primarily to examine how the department is progressing in achieving national targets and working to national policies. There is also a link to achieving national targets around specific grant claims.

The summary feedback from the Summer 1999 review was:

"In summary you are making some progress in managing the policy agenda and implementing change across the full range of services within the target policy areas. We recognise that this has been somewhat thwarted by the reconfiguration of the Health Authority. Planning processes had been affected by the delay of the Health Improvement Programme, (HImP), but there was felt to be sufficient groundwork established to progress the joint agenda. There are specific proposals; but they need to demonstrate a greater understanding of the National Priorities Guidance targets and show a more detailed account of how you will make use of the Grant opportunity [Partnership Grant, Prevention Grant and Carers Grant].

"A further assessment is planned for the Autumn of 1999. It is expected that this will include a review of the progress on core items included in the current exercise, and further analysis of the use of Social Services resources. This will follow the publication of the first Performance Assessment Framework data set in the early Autumn".

These matters have been addressed.

As a result of these visits we can be assured that we are improving our services in line with government policy.

 

 

 

Social Services Inspectorate: Inspection of Social Services and Voluntary Sector Working Relationships

Norfolk County Council was one of eight authorities that were inspected. The inspection involved 20 interviews, 8 meetings with interested groups, 4 visits to voluntary organisations, studying files and analysing 59 questionnaires sent to Voluntary Organisations.

The report was considered at the Social Inclusion and Care Cabinet Committee in January 2000.

The report concluded overall:

"That Norfolk SSD had developed and sustained a sound and mutually productive relationships with the voluntary sector in its area and that this was facilitated and underpinned by operational, planning and contracting systems which generally were effective. The value of a diverse and healthy voluntary sector in the delivery of social care to the population of Norfolk was recognised consistently by officers and members of the department and authority.

"A high degree of professional commitment to stimulate, nurture and sustain the sector was also evident throughout the department. Most voluntary sector organisations themselves viewed their relations with the department and authority in a positive light, and a high degree of mutual appreciation was apparent".

The recommendations were:

Policy, Planning and Consultation

The Social Services department should:

  • differentiate between its own and voluntary sector complaints on its database and in its report to councillors
  • ensure that its planning groups contain the most appropriate representation from the voluntary sector and that the nature of that representation is clear
  • ensure that consultation includes the effective representation of black and minority ethnic populations
  • ensure that consideration of black and ethnic minority issues is more visibly integrated into service planning
  • map the needs of its black and minority ethnic populations
  • ensure that the voluntary sector is in touch with and sensitive to the needs of Norfolk’s black and minority ethnic populations
  • ensure that the development of a local compact adequately encompasses issues of equality of opportunity
  • formally map its communication with voluntary sector organisations to reassure itself that communication lines are effective and that the timescales set for consultation are realistic.

 

 

Local Authority Roles

The Social Services department should:

  • consolidate its guidance concerning staff conduct and relationships with the voluntary sector and ensure its implementation
  • ensure that the voluntary sector organisations are aware of the position of elected members in respect of their involvement with the voluntary sector
  • ensure that there is equity in the distribution of Liaison Officer roles, and that Liaison Officer duties and responsibilities form an explicitly part of staff supervision and appraisal
  • review its guidance to Liaison Officers about performance assessment.

 

Policy Implementation, Service Delivery and Review

The Social Services department should:

  • ensure that its requirements concerning the empowerment of users of voluntary sector organisation services are being implemented
  • review arrangements for informing voluntary sector organisations about funding opportunities to ensure that it adopts an equitable approach to the voluntary sector
  • ensure that the reasons for decisions about funding are communicated to voluntary sector organisations and that they are understood
  • ensure that the voluntary sector organisations it funds have an appropriate complaints procedure and that the users of services are aware of it and their right to independent advocacy in using it
  • develop the specification in service agreements and grants so that voluntary sector organisations are clear about what is expected of them, particularly the outcomes for service users
  • review its requirements concerning the sharing of information, particularly n child protection and public interest matters
  • ensure that review arrangements incorporate input from services users and other key stakeholders (e.g. social workers)
  • ensure that those voluntary sector organisations it funds are providing services on an equitable basis to the population(s) they serve. An initial step would be to request information about the ethnicity and other issues relating to equality of opportunity of the users of their services and people referred to them.

 

An action plan is being compiled to address these recommendations.

 

 

    1. How We Involved the Public Last Year

 

Types of Involvement Last Year

SERVICE THEME

Method of involvement

Educ Cult
& LL
Soc /
Care
Safer
Com.
Econ
Dev.
Sus
Dev
Strat P&T BetterGov Total

%

1

Survey

28

11

11

8

0

0

4

3

65

46.4%

2

Focus Group

1

3

2

2

0

0

1

2

11

7.9%

3

Panel inc. Citizens' Panel

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

2

1.4%

4

Jury

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0.0%

5

Public Meetings

2

0

2

0

0

0

1

0

5

3.6%

6

Service user forum / meeting

1

1

5

1

0

0

0

0

8

5.7%

7

Issue forum / meeting

0

1

3

0

0

0

1

1

6

4.3%

8

Shared interest forum / meeting

0

2

2

1

0

0

1

0

6

4.3%

9

Area / local forum / meeting

1

1

0

1

0

0

1

0

4

2.9%

10

Documents / letters / leaflets

3

1

6

1

2

0

4

1

18

12.9%

11

Complaints / suggestion schemes

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0.7%

12

Interactive website

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

2

1.4%

13

User management of services

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0.0%

14

Exhibitions

1

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

3

2.1%

15

Other

5

1

3

0

0

0

0

0

9

6.4%

 

Total

42

22

34

15

2

0

17

8

140

100.0%

Note:

    1 Some consultations used more than one method of consultation and have therefore been entered more than once, leading to totals higher than the number of consultations

    2 Some consultations covered more than one service theme, but have been entered once under the most relevant theme

     

     

List of Last Year’s Involvement Exercises

 

Theme / Consultation name Method (s) Contact name Tel

Carers' Consultation re services 1, 7, 8, 10 Maureen Begley 01603 223179

Children of Foster Carers 1, 6 Sean Loughlin 01603 437811

Community Support Consultation 1 Sean Loughlin 01603 437811

Foster Carer Exit Interviews 1 Sean Loughlin 01603 437811

Gt Yarmouth Social Strat. - document & priorities 7, 8, 10 Sue Craythorne 01603 223816

It's not how old you are, it's how you are old 1, 6, Elena Murray 01603 223179

Joint Strategic Issues 1, 7, 10 Elena Murray 01603 223179

Looked After Children 1 Sean Loughlin 01603 437811

Mental Health Strategic Developments 6, 10, 15 Maureen Begley 01603 223179

Modernisation of In house day services 1,2,5,6,10,15 Maureen Begley 01603 223179

Planned Placement Survey 1 Sean Loughlin 01603 437811

Refocusing day services (Learning Disability) 1, 2, 5, 6, 10, 15 Maureen Begley 01603 223179

Residential Education Survey 1 Sean Loughlin 01603 437811

CONSULTATION ON THE 2000 Child Care and

Early Years Development Plan

Who was consulted?

Service users

Service providers – maintained, private and voluntary

Service sponsors i.e. the LEA , Social services and the Health Authority

How were they consulted?

Children were interviewed in person

Parents were interviewed by telephone Providers were given a questionnaire

A conference of partners was also held at which a draft plan was presented

How many were involved?

20 Children

500 parents who used services

500 providers

35 partners

When were they consulted?

January 2000

Who organised the consultation?

Education Department engaged a firm called Bostock Marketing

What were they consulted about?

The content of a Childcare and Early years plan

What were the findings?
  1. There is a lack of childcare in the birth to 2 age group, also in after-school care and holiday care. There is no geographic information to enable clients to work out what is available in their locality.
  2. There is a need to work out what facilities are in place by area
What could have been done better
  1. The planning of the consultation could have been improved
  2. It is important to be able to pull together the relevant information from within the Authority this means having the appropriate information systems in place.
  3. More use could have been made of the development workers employed by the County Council.
What action has been taken?
  1. The plan was based as far as possible on the results on the consultation.
  2. Next years’ plan will address more fully the findings of this years consultation
  3. The finished Plan has been submitted to the DfEE for approval; this is a requirement. Once DfEE accepts it, a summary version will be produced for publication.

      Who has more information?

    Marcelle Curtis, Education Officer (tel 10603 224386)

 

 

CONSULTATION ON THE

GREAT YARMOUTH SOCIAL STRATEGY

Who was consulted?

 

120 local organisations

Local residents

How were they consulted?

The Partnership working groups produced a range of topics, which were presented to a Conference of local organisations.

The outcome of the Conference was put to local residents via a leaflet and questionnaire on the strategy.

How many were involved?

5 working groups

120 local organisations

46,000 local residents

When were they consulted?

April Conference

November information/questionnaire

Who organised the consultation?

Great Yarmouth Social Strategy Partnership

What were they consulted about?

The content of the Social Strategy

What were the findings?

The Conference was the main focus of the exercise and the findings of this were fed into the strategy development process.

What action has been taken?

    Some changes were made to the strategy as a result.

      Who has more information?

    Sue Craythorne, Policy Unit tel 3816

 

 

 

    1. Services We Reviewed Last Year
    2. There were no Best Value Reviews to report for 1999/2000 under Social Inclusion and Care

       

       

    3. Major Investments We Made Last Year

Each Year the County Council invests millions of pounds on schemes of new buildings, roads and communication networks. These form the "Capital" expenditure programme. This section briefly describes those major schemes that we completed last year.

Residential Therapeutic Unit

Earthsea House, Honingham opened in June 1999 and provides a new residential home for 8 young children aged between 8 and 10 on admission. These children have been emotionally or psychologically damaged by early childhood trauma such as abuse or serious neglect. The Home is a joint project run by the Peper Harow Foundation who have 30 years experience in providing this type of care. In addition to the new Home, the former school buildings on site have been adapted to provide educational, social, workshop and conference facilities. Together the two schemes cost 374,000

IT systems for effective delivery of social services

Successful delivery of Social Services depends critically on having the right information – about both clients and their needs and on the resources available to meet those needs. The Service has therefore invested in two major information systems. One is a Home Care Management system, aimed at reducing the cost of this part of the Service by streamlining the administrative process. The other system provides:

  • an up-to-date data base on services available, both from the department and external organisations,
  • a data base on all known clients
  • automated office systems whereby routines are undertaken automatically, thereby freeing up staff time.

The systems have cost 1.5 million.

 

 

 

  1. PLANS FOR 2000/2001
  2.  

    1. Planned Activities and Expected Achievements

Our aim is to encourage economic and social inclusion of people who are disadvantaged.

We pursue this aim through four main areas of activity:

  1. by supporting those excluded from the labour market by assisting individuals to participate in economic activity
  2. by contributing to health improvement
  3. by assisting children to achieve their full range of developmental and emotional needs and to safeguard them from harm
  4. by promoting the independence of vulnerable adults and their carers.

 

 

 

      A) Supporting those Excluded from the Labour Market

Impact of this year’s actions

  • Disadvantaged groups have more opportunities for employment and training
  • We have a solid foundation for actions in future years to tackle this need.

Main activities this year

  • Developing an anti poverty strategy for the County Council
  • Developing partnership working in this area
  • Integrating social inclusion issues into best value reviews
  • Ensuring consultation mechanisms include socially excluded groups
  • Through Shaping the Future addressing the needs of groups disadvantaged in the labour market
  • Ensuring Social Services develops its day services to meet employment and training needs of people with learning disabilities and rehabilitation for substance misusers etc.
  • Increasing support to carers to remain or return to employment
  • Developing a better understanding between the voluntary and statutory sector on issues such as core funding and maintaining the independence of the voluntary sector.

Achievements expected this year

  • A multi agency partnership around the Department of Health’s Welfare to Work Joint Investment Plan.
  • A partnership between Social Services and providers of education, employment and training initiatives
  • Awareness amongst County Council Members and employees of social inclusion issues
  • A published County Council anti poverty strategy
  • Action plans to implement a Social Cohesion Strategy
  • An agreed Norfolk Compact with the statutory and voluntary sectors.

Statutory (*) and Other Plans relevant to these activities

  • Norfolk Carers’ Plan *
  • ‘Shaping the Future’ partnership’s Social Cohesion Strategy (under development)
  • County Council Social Inclusion Strategy (under development).

 

 

 

 

B) Contributing to Health Improvement

Impact of this year’s actions

  • Children and adolescents have easier access to quality mental health services
  • Children increase their basic skills through parental support
  • Fewer teenagers become pregnant
  • Young people have improved health through a Healthy Norfolk Schools Scheme
  • Older people have fewer falls and road traffic accidents
  • Norfolk’s Health Improvement Programme is effectively managed and developed
  • More people adopt a healthier lifestyle through walking and cycling.

Main activities this year

  • Contributing to development of new strategies within the Health Improvement Programme (HImP)
  • Supporting county wide HImP campaigns
  • Participating in the Norfolk Drug Action Team to create and deliver the Annual Plan
  • Implementing the County Child and Adolescent Mental Health Strategy
  • Playing an active role in the pre-school "Surestart" programmes in Norwich and Great Yarmouth
  • Contributing to reducing teenage pregnancies and supporting teenage parents
  • Developing the Healthy Norfolk Schools Scheme as part of a national pilot
  • Contributing to the multi agency accident reduction strategy
  • Encouraging walking and cycling by developing the Local Transport Plan
  • Developing (with Great Yarmouth Borough Council) a pilot "proof of age card" to deter young people from illegally buying age restricted products
  • Enforcing food safety legislation on correct labelling and nutritional information.

Achievements expected this year

  • Partnership strategies for helping older people and adults of working age with a mental illness
  • Joint commissioning of drug and alcohol services
  • Surestart programmes implemented in Norwich and Great Yarmouth
  • Two further multi agency Family Support Teams to give a total of five providing support to children and adolescents with mental health problems
  • Plans to reduce teenage pregnancies, with a focus on Norwich and Great Yarmouth
  • Healthy Norfolk Schools Scheme pilot completed and evaluated in 12 schools and plans made to roll out programme to include all schools by 2001
  • A county wide sustainable programme of exercise for older people, targeted at those at risk of falls
  • Safer and Healthier Journeys to School Plans agreed in pilot schools
  • Fewer cigarettes sold to young people.

Statutory (*) and Other Plans relevant to these activities

  • The Norfolk Health Improvement Programme *, published by Norfolk Health Authority (under development)
  • Drug Action Team Action Plan * (under development)
  • Draft Local Transport Plan *
  • Norfolk’s Prevention Plan *
  •  
  • Surestart delivery plans – Norwich, Great Yarmouth
  • Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services Strategy – Norfolk Health Authority / Social Services Department

 

 

 

      C) Assisting Children to Achieve their Full Range of Developmental and Emotional Needs and to Safeguard Them from Harm

Impact of this year’s actions

  • There is an increased choice of adoption, fostering and residential placements for looked after children
  • Children receive more effective help through improved assessment and planning, especially with other agencies
  • Looked after children have improved life chances
  • Children, young people and their families have a greater say in our services
  • Children with disabilities and their families have greater support through respite services
  • Less youth crime through multi agency approaches to prevention and youth offending
  • Young carers receive greater support.

Longer term objective

  • An holistic response to children in need through a Children’s Service Plan process with service planning and delivery jointly within the County Council and with other agencies.

Main activities this year

  • Developing protection of children from emotional, physical and sexual abuse and significant harm
  • Working with other agencies to develop preventative services to support children and families
  • Implementing the Government’s "Quality Protects" initiative to improve children’s services
  • Developing multi agency approaches to youth offending
  • Introducing regulation to small children’s homes.

 

Achievements expected this year

  • An increase in the number of fostering placements
  • An additional 14 residential places in Norfolk
  • Production and implementation of new child protection procedures, including staff training
  • Creation of joint posts to improve health and educational assessments and planning of looked after children (senior nurse practitioner, educational psychologist)
  • Additional support to families via an increase in social workers’ family support budgets
  • A comprehensive user involvement strategy which informs service review, planning and development
  • An additional 6 short break beds for children with learning disabilities/ challenging behaviour to be provided in Norfolk, plus an increase of 30,000 in the budget for respite services
  • New services through Youth Offending Teams / On Track bids (if successful)
  • Expanded services by providing additional funding for Young Carers Schools Workers and young carers groups
  • Extended regulation in small children’s homes.

Relevant Best Value Reviews scheduled for 2000/01

  • Services for children looked after by the County Council, including children with disabilities (see section 4.3.2)
  • Child Protection service (see section 4.3.2)

Statutory (*) and Other Plans relevant to these activities

  • The Quality Protects Management Action Plan *, Social Services Department
  • The Area Child Protection Committee Annual Report *, Social Services Department
  • The County Youth Justice Plan *
  • Norfolk’s Children's Services Plan, 1999/2000 *
  • Norfolk Carers Plan *
  • The Early Years and Childcare Plan *
  • Norfolk Social Services Department Departmental Training Plan *
  • The Education Development Plan *, Education Department
  • The Behaviour Support Plan *, Education Department
  • The Norfolk Health Improvement Programme *, published by Norfolk Health Authority (under development)
  • Surestart delivery plans, - Norwich, Great Yarmouth
  • The Child and Adolescent Mental Health Strategy, Norfolk Health Authority / Social Services Department.

 

 

 

 

      D) Promoting the Independence of Vulnerable Adults and their Carers

Impact of this year’s actions

  • Service users receive a more effective service
  • People have less time to wait for an assessment of their need for services
  • People find it easier to find out about care services and gain access to them
  • People have greater choice and control of care through direct payment.

Medium term objectives

  • To implement a jointly agreed strategy for preventative services by March 2002
  • To provide more diverse and flexible opportunities to give carers a break, by March 2002
  • To implement the National Service Frameworks for mental health for adults and for older people.

Main activities this year

  • In partnership with other agencies, developing plans to improve services which promote independence
  • Developing multi disciplinary assessments for older people
  • Developing a multi agency strategy for carers
  • Reviewing continuing care criteria between health and social services
  • Developing and implementing Joint Investment Plans for adults with mental illness and older people
  • Continuing to reorganise the provision of Social Services residential homes for older people
  • Completing a Joint Investment Plan for people with a learning disability
  • Developing partnership strategies for adults with physical and sensory disabilities
  • Improving joint public information in key areas (for carers and people with mental health problems)
  • Implementing the recommendations of the Meals on Wheels Review
  • Developing more flexible home care services to help people stay at home and promote rehabilitation
  • Continue implementing the Direct Payments scheme and look to extending it to older people
  • Developing a new residential service for 5/6 deaf blind people with an associated day centre
  • Continue developing the Community Legal Service in Norfolk.

Achievements expected this year

  • Assertive outreach teams and out of hours services for people with a mental illness
  • Better assessments and more coherent service packages for older people
  • Health and social services occupational therapists working together, leading to faster assessment, delivery of equipment and adaptations
  • Residents from Huntingfield transferred to Barley Court sheltered housing scheme
  • Improved choice and appropriateness from the reorganisation of learning disability day services in Great Yarmouth
  • A joint local charter for long term care by June 2000
  • A carers booklet for Norfolk distributed by June 2000
  • Greater geographical coverage and improved nutritional content of meals on wheels
  • More people involved in Direct Payments Schemes
  • Three Community Legal Service Partnerships to cover the whole County.

Relevant Best Value Reviews scheduled for 2000/01

  • Assessment and Care Management for Older People (see section 4.3.2)
  • Services for people with physical disabilities (see section 4.3.2)
  • Residential Care for Older People (see section 4.3.2)

Statutory (*) and Other Plans relevant to these activities

  • Norfolk’s Community Care Plan 1999/2000 *
  • Norfolk’s Carers’ Plan *
  • Norfolk’s Prevention Plan *
  • Norfolk’s Partnership Plan *
  • Norfolk Social Services Department Training Plan *
  • Norfolk Mental Health Grant Training Plan *
  • Joint Investment Plan for Older People *, published by Norfolk Health Authority
  • The Norfolk Health Improvement Plan *, published by Norfolk Health Authority (under development)
  • Norfolk Local Implementation Plan / Joint Investment Plan for Adult Mental Health Services *, published by Norfolk Health Authority, (under development)
  • Me, Myself and I, East Norfolk Health Authority / Social Services Department strategy for people with learning difficulties
  • Implementation of Me, Myself and I, Social Services Department, 1998
  • Joint Strategic Framework for Older People with Mental Health Problems, Social Services Department / Norfolk Health Authority
  • Residential Review, Social Services Department
  • Joint Public Information Project Action Plan, Social Services Department / Norfolk Health Authority
  • Commissioning Framework, Social Services Department.

 

 

    1. Our Targets for Measures of Success
    2. The tables below show targets for the measures of success we are planning to use. Target values for the coming year and in five year’s time are shown alongside the current value (that estimated for 1999/2000).

      Performance Indicators, (PIs), shown with a "BVPI" number are those required by Central Government as part of Best Value. Those with an "ACPI" number provide greater detail and are required by the Audit Commission. The remaining indicators are "local" and chosen by us to measure our success in achieving our objectives.

      Measure

      [a mix of AC, high level & departmental PIs]

      Current

      Value

      Target for 2000/2001

      Target 5 years hence

      Assisting children to achieve developmental and emotional needs and be safeguarded from harm
      BVPI 49/A1 - Stability of placements of children looked after (% of children looked after with 3 or more placements during the year)

      22%

      17%

      16%

      C23 - % of children looked after who were adopted during the year

      4.8%

      5.9%

      Not set

      BVPI 61/E44 - Expenditure on family support as a % of expenditure on all children’s services

      29%

      30%

      To be set next year

      A3 - % of children registered during the year on the Child Protection Register who had been previously registered

      7%

      6%

      Not set

      C20 - % of child protection register cases that should have been reviewed during the year and were reviewed

      100%

      100%

      100%

      C25 - % of inspections of residential care homes for children which should have been carried out in the year and that were carried out

      100%

      100%

      100%

      C22 - % of looked after children that are in foster placements or placed for adoption

      77%

      78%

      Not set

      BVPI 51/B8 - Gross weekly expenditure per child looked after in foster care or in a children’s home

      394

      385

      309

      Promoting the independence of vulnerable adults and their carers
      C29 – People aged 18-64 with physical disabilities helped to live at home per 1,000 population aged 18-64

      2.6

      2.7

      Not set

      C30 – People aged 18-64 with learning disabilities helped to live at home per 1,000 population aged 18-64

      2.7

      2.8

      Not set

      C31 – People aged 18-64 with mental health problems helped to live at home per 1,000 population aged 18-64

      0.8

      1.0

      Not set

      Measure

      [a mix of AC, high level & departmental PIs]

      Current

      Value

      Target for 2000/2001

      Target 5 years hence

      BVPI 54/C32 - People aged 65 or over helped to live at home per 1,000 population aged 65 or over

      53

      55

      Not set

      C26 – Admissions of people aged 65 or over to residential/nursing care per 10,000 population aged 65 or over

      131

      129

      Not set

      C27 – Admissions of people aged 18-64 to residential/nursing care per 10,000 population aged 18-64

      8.5

      8.0

      Not set

      BVPI 53/C28 – Number of households receiving intensive home care per 1,000 aged 65 or over

      6.8

      7.3

      To follow

      BVPI 56/D38 - % of items of equipment less than 1000 delivered within 3 weeks

      90%

      92%

      96%

      BVPI 58/D39 - % of people receiving a service who received a statement of their needs and how they will be met

      75%

      95%

      96%

      C34 - % of inspections of residential care homes for adults which should have been carried out that were carried out

      100%

      100%

      100%

      BVPI 52/B12 - For adults aged 18 or over, the gross weekly cost of intensive social care for adults per supported resident or households receiving intensive home care

      325

      320

      293

       

       

       

       

    3. Expected Audit and Inspection in the Coming Year
    •  

Agency

Date

Subject

Social Services Inspectorate (SSI) Nov 2000 Review of Child Care
District Audit   Occupational Therapy equipment and adaptations
Audit Commission   Services for older people with mental health problems
Audit Commission   Rehabilitation services for older people
SSI/Regional Dept of Health twice yearly follow up to self-assessment returns
Mental Health Act Commission twice yearly short quasi-judicial / inspection visits

 

 

 

 

    1. Plans for Involvement this Coming Year
    2. Types of Involvement Planned for the Coming Year

       

      SERVICE THEME

      Method of involvement

      Educ Cult
      & LL
      Soc /
      Care
      Safer
      Com.
      Econ
      Dev.
      Sus
      Dev
      Strat P&T BetterGov Total

      %

      1

      Survey

      17

      7

      12

      2

      0

      1

      4

      1

      44

      26.3%

      2

      Focus Group

      0

      4

      7

      0

      0

      1

      0

      2

      14

      8.4%

      3

      Panel inc. Citizens' Panel

      0

      0

      0

      1

      0

      1

      0

      1

      3

      1.8%

      4

      Jury

      0

      0

      0

      0

      0

      0

      0

      0

      0

      0.0%

      5

      Public Meetings

      2

      0

      2

      0

      0

      0

      0

      0

      4

      2.4%

      6

      Service user forum / meeting

      4

      1

      13

      0

      0

      0

      0

      0

      18

      10.8%

      7

      Issue forum / meeting

      0

      1

      6

      1

      0

      1

      1

      0

      10

      6.0%

      8

      Shared interest forum / meeting

      1

      2

      4

      0

      0

      0

      2

      0

      9

      5.4%

      9

      Area / local forum / meeting

      1

      0

      0

      0

      0

      0

      6

      0

      7

      4.2%

      10

      Documents / letters / leaflets

      7

      1

      9

      0

      2

      0

      12

      0

      31

      18.6%

      11

      Complaints / suggestion schemes

      0

      0

      0

      0

      0

      0

      0

      0

      0

      0.0%

      12

      Interactive website

      0

      0

      1

      0

      0

      0

      0

      0

      1

      0.6%

      13

      User management of services

      0

      0

      1

      0

      0

      0

      0

      0

      1

      0.6%

      14

      Exhibitions

      0

      0

      0

      0

      0

      1

      5

      0

      6

      3.6%

      15

      Other

      4

      1

      7

      0

      0

      0

      4

      3

      19

      11.4%

       

      Total

      36

      17

      62

      4

      2

      5

      34

      7

      167

      100.0%

      Note:

      1 Some consultations used more than one method of consultation and have therefore been entered more than once, leading to totals higher than the number of consultations

      2 Some consultations covered more than one service theme, but have been entered once under the most relevant theme

      List of Involvement Exercises for the Coming Year

      Theme / Consultation name Method (s) Contact name Tel

      Adoption Agency Review - Prospective Adopters 1, 7 Malcolm Pim 01603 223432

      Best Value Review - Child Protection Steve Briggs 01603 495151

      Best Value Review - Looked After Children Steve Briggs 01603 495151

      BV Review - Services for People with a physical disability Laurie A'Court 01603 223744

      BV review of fieldwork, assess & care mgt for older people Roger Cotterell 01692 500550

      BV review of residential / nursing care for older people Lesley Stephen 01603 223193

      Carers' Consultation re services 1, 6, 7, 8 Maureen Begley 01603 223179

      Children & Families - Health Survey 1, 2 Sean Loughlin 01603 437811

      Children of Foster Carers Group 6, 15 Sean Loughlin 01603 437811

      Community Support 1 Sean Loughlin 01603 437811

      Consulting on Prevention Plan 7, 8, 10, 15 Maureen Begley 01603 223179

      Consulting on Prevention Plan 7, 8, 10 Maureen Begley 01603 223179

      Consumer Views of Families & Children Disabilities 1, 6 Nick Loone 01603 423429

      D.D.A. & Access to County Council Services 6, 15 Bernadette Sanders 01603 223413

      Direct Payments - People with a disability Laurie A'Court 01603 223744

      Exit Interviews for LAC 1 Sean Loughlin 01603 437811

      Extension of Direct Payments to Older People John Butler 01603 223340

      First Stage Complaints Survey 1 Sean Loughlin 01603 437811

      Foster Carer Exit Interviews Sean Loughlin 01603 437811

      Implementation of National Service Framework 2,5,6,10,12,13,15 Maureen Begley 01603 223179

      Joint Investment Plan - Learning Disabilities 2, 6, 7, 10 Maureen Begley 01603 223179

      Joint Investment Planning - Welfare to Work 6, 7, 10 Maureen Begley 01603 223179

      Joint Strat. Older People / Joint Investment Plans 6, 10 Maureen Begley 01603 223179

      Local Long Term Care Charter 2, 10, 15 Elena Murray 01603 223179

      Meals on Wheels 1, 2, 6, 15 Maureen Begley 01603 223179

      Needs of Ethnic Minorities re: Social Care 2, 10 Maureen Begley 01603 223179

      Professionals/Local Residents/Users Meetings 1, 6 Sean Loughlin 01603 437811

      Quality Projects - Management Action Plan Geoff Gildersleeve 01603 223432

      Quality projects - user involvement strategy Geoff Gildersleeve 01603 223432

      Refocusing day services (Learning Disability) 1,2,5,6,8,10,15 Maureen Begley 01603 223179

      Service User & Carer Feedback Exercise 1 Malcolm Pim 01603 223432

      Statutory Reviews & Young People 1 Sean Loughlin 01603 437811

      Strategy for people with a physical disability Laurie A'Court 01603 223744

      Young People in Residential Care 6 Maureen Begley 01603 223179

      Young Persons Consultation Group 6 Sean Loughlin 01603 437811

       

    3. The 5 Year Programme of Service Reviews

 

Year

(ending March)

 

      Topic Area

2001

 

 

 

 

Described below:
  • Services for people with physical disabilities
  • Services for children looked after by the County Council
  • Residential Care for Older People
  • Assessment and Care Management for Older People
  • Child protection service

2002

 

  • Services for older people (excluding residential care)
  • Management and support services

2003

 

 

  • Service agreements (with voluntary organisations)
  • Mental Health services
  • Under 8’s

2004

 

  • Learning Disability services
  • Travellers

2005

None currently planned

 

 

Services for people with physical disabilities

What the Review will cover All services for adults with physical disabilities, including occupational therapy services
Why we are doing the review in 2000/01 The service has been under increasing pressure from rising demand in the last few years.

 

      Services for children looked after by the County Council

What the Review will cover The four key aspects of the provision of accommodation for looked-after-children:

- residential care - foster care

- adoption services - leaving care services

Why we are doing the review in 2000/01 This is a key service and one where costs have risen considerably in recent years

 

Residential Care for Older People

What the Review will cover The review will encompass all residential and nursing home care purchased or provided by Social Services
Why we are doing the review in 2000/01 This is a major area of expenditure for the department (75 million gross per annum), and is going through a period of change in terms of style of provision, Government objectives and regulation and the future of the in-house service

 

Assessment and Care Management for Older People

What the Review will cover The review will encompass the assessment of the needs of individuals and arranging and reviewing their care
Why we are doing the review in 2000/01 This complements the review of residential care as assessment is the earlier part of the process of caring for clients

 

Child Protection Service

What the Review will cover

 

The review will encompass child protection services and may include the child protection legal services provided by the Director of Law and Administration
Why we are doing the review in 2000/01 This is an extremely high-profile and critical service, which has been under considerable pressure in recent years

 

 

    1. Major Investments We are Making

Each Year the County Council invests millions of pounds on schemes of new buildings, roads and communication networks. These form the "Capital" expenditure programme. This section briefly describes those major schemes in which we will be investing during the coming year.

Redevelopment of the Oaks

This scheme is in 2 parts. Phase 1 has seen the existing buildings on Harvey Lane, Norwich, improved to provide a range of child and family care services. Phase 2 is a new residential unit for 7 children, due for completion early in 2001. This home will provide stays of up to 3 months for assessment, relief care and bridging to fostering or other placements. The aim is to reduce the number of moves children have while in care. Total scheme costs will be 650,000 of which 400,000 will be required in the coming year